The Critical Imperative of Data Center Physical Security

September 12, 2023 at 8:00 am by Amanda Canale

In our data-driven world, data centers serve as the backbone of the digital revolution. They house an immense amount of sensitive information critical to organizations, ranging from financial records to personal data. Ensuring the physical security of data centers is of paramount importance. After all, a data center’s physical property is the first level of security. By meeting the ever-evolving security mandates and controlling access to the premises, while maintaining and documenting a chain of custody during data decommissioning, data centers ensure that only authorized personnel have the privilege to interact with and access systems and their sensitive information.

Levels of Security Within Data Centers

Before any discussion on physical security best practices for data centers can begin, it’s important to think of data center security as a multi-layered endeavor, with each level meticulously designed to strengthen the protection of data against potential breaches and unauthorized access. 

Data centers with multi-level security measures, like Google and their six levels of data center security, represent the pinnacle of data infrastructure sophistication. These facilities are designed to provide an exceptional level of reliability and high security, offering the utmost advances in modern day security, ensuring data remains available, secure, and accessible. 

Below we have briefly broken down each security level to offer an inside peek at Google’s advanced security levels and best practices, as they serve as a great framework for data centers. 

  • Level 1: Physical property surrounding the facility, including gates, fences, and other more significant forms of defenses.
  • Level 2: Secure perimeter, complete with 24/7 security staff, smart fencing, surveillance cameras, and other perimeter defense systems.
  • Level 3: Data center entry is only accessible with a combination of company-issued ID badges, iris and facial scans, and other identification-confirming methods.
  • Level 4: The security operations center (SOC) houses the facility’s entire surveillance and monitoring systems and is typically managed by a select group of security personnel.
  • Level 5: The data center floor only allows access to a small percentage of facility staff, typically made up solely of engineers and technicians.
  • Level 6: Secure, in-house data destruction happens in the final level and serves as the end-of-life data’s final stop in its chain of custody. In this level, there is typically a secure two-way access system to ensure all end-of-life data is properly destroyed, does not leave the facility, and is only handled by staff with the highest level of clearance.

As technology continues to advance, we can expect data centers to evolve further, setting new, intricate, and more secure standards for data management in the digital age.

Now that you have this general overview of best practices, let’s dive deeper.

Key Elements of Data Center Physical Security

Effective data center physical security involves a combination of policies, procedures, and technologies. Let’s focus on five main elements today:

  • Physical barriers
  • Surveillance and monitoring
  • Access controls and visitor management
  • Environmental controls
  • Secure in-house data decommissioning
Physical Barriers

Regardless of the type of data center and industry, the first level of security is the physical property boundaries surrounding the facility. These property boundaries can range widely but typically include a cocktail of signage, fencing, reinforced doors, walls, and other significant forms of perimeter defenses that are meant to deter, discourage, or delay any unauthorized entry.  

Physical security within data centers is not a mere addendum to cybersecurity; it is an integral component in ensuring the continued operation, reputation, and success of the organizations that rely on your data center to safeguard their most valuable assets.

Surveillance and Monitoring

Data centers store vast amounts of sensitive information, making them prime targets for cybercriminals and physical intruders. Surveillance and monitoring systems are the vigilant watchdogs of data centers and act as a critical line of defense against unauthorized access. High-definition surveillance and CCTV cameras, alarm systems, and motion detectors work in harmony to help deter potential threats and provide real-time alerts, enabling prompt action to mitigate security breaches.

Access Controls and Visitor Management

Not all entrants are employees or authorized visitors. Access controls go hand-in-hand with surveillance and monitoring; both methods ensure that only authorized personnel can enter the facility. Control methods include biometric authentication, key cards, PINs, and other secure methods that help verify the identity of individuals seeking entry. These controls, paired with visitor management systems, allow facilities to control who may enter the facility, and allows staff to maintain logs and escort policies to track the movements of guests and service personnel. These efforts minimize the risk of unauthorized access, and by preventing unauthorized access, access controls significantly reduce the risk of security breaches.

Under the umbrella of access controls and visitor management is another crucial step in ensuring that only authorized persons have access to the data: assigning and maintaining a chain of custody. 

But what exactly is a chain of custody?

A chain of custody is a documented trail that meticulously records the handling, movement, and access, and activity to data. In the context of data centers, it refers to the tracking and documenting of data assets as they move within the facility, and throughout their lifecycle. A robust chain of custody ensures that data is always handled only by authorized personnel. Every interaction with the data, whether it’s during maintenance, migration, backup, or destruction, is documented. This transparency greatly reduces the risk of unauthorized access or tampering, enhancing overall data security and helps maintain data integrity, security, and compliance with regulations.

Environmental Controls

Within the walls of data centers, a crucial aspect of safeguarding your digital assets lies in environmental controls, so facilities must not only fend off human threats but environmental hazards, as well. As unpredictable as fires, floods, and extreme temperatures can be, data centers must implement robust environmental control systems as they are essential in preventing equipment damage and data loss. 

Environmental control systems include, but are not limited to:

  • Advanced fire suppression systems to extinguish fires quickly while minimizing damage to both equipment and data.
  • Uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) and generators ensure continuous operation even in the face of electrical disruptions.
  • Advanced air filtration and purification systems mitigate dust and contaminants that can harm your equipment, keeping your servers and equipment uncompromised. 
  • Leak detection systems are crucial for any data center. They are designed to identify even the smallest amount of leaks and trigger immediate responses to prevent further damage.

These systems are the unsung heroes, ensuring the optimal conditions for your data to (securely) thrive and seamlessly integrate with physical security measures.

In-House Data Decommissioning

While there’s often a strong emphasis on data collection and storage (rightfully so), an equally vital aspect in data center security is often overlooked—data decommissioning. In-house data decommissioning is the process of securely and responsibly disposing of any data considered “end-of-life,” ultimately empowers organizations to maintain better control over their data assets. Simply put, this translates to the physical destruction of any media that is deemed end-of-life by way of crushing for hard disk drives (HDDs), shredding for paper and solid state drives (SSDs), and more. 

When data is properly managed and disposed of, organizations can more effectively enforce data retention policies, ensuring that only relevant and up-to-date information is retained. This, in turn, leads to improved data governance and reduces the risk of unauthorized access to sensitive data.

In-house data decommissioning ensures that sensitive data is disposed of properly, reducing the risk of data leaks or breaches. It also helps organizations comply with data privacy regulations such as GDPR and HIPAA, which often require stringent secure data disposal practices.

Physical Security Compliance Regulations

We understand that not all compliance regulations are a one-size-fits-all solution for your data center’s security needs. However, the following regulations can still offer invaluable insights and a robust cybersecurity framework to follow, regardless of your specific industry or requirements. 

ISO 27001: Information Security Management System (ISMS)

ISO 27001 is an internationally recognized standard that encompasses a holistic approach to information security. This compliance regulation covers aspects such as physical security, personnel training, risk management, and incident response, ensuring a comprehensive security framework.

When it comes to physical security, ISO 27001 provides a roadmap for implementing stringent access controls, including role-based permissions, multi-factor authentication, and visitor management systems, and the implementation of surveillance systems, intrusion detection, and perimeter security. Combined, these controls help data centers ensure that only authorized personnel can enter the facility and access sensitive areas. 

Data centers that adopt ISO 27001 create a robust framework for identifying, assessing, and mitigating security risks. 

ISO 27002: Information Security, Cybersecurity, and Privacy Protection – Information Security Controls

ISO 27002 offers guidelines and best practices to help organizations establish, implement, maintain, and continually improve an information security management system, or ISMS. While ISO 27001 defines the requirements for an ISMS, ISO 27002 provides the practical controls for data centers and organizations to implement so various information security risks can be addressed. (It’s important to note that an organization can be certified in ISO 27001, but not in ISO 27002 as it simply serves as a guide. 

While ISO 27002’s focus is not solely on physical security, this comprehensive practice emphasizes the importance of conducting thorough risk assessments to identify vulnerabilities and potential threats in data centers, which can include physical threats just as much as cyber ones. Since data centers house sensitive hardware, software, and infrastructure, they are already a major target for breaches and attacks. ISO 27002 provides detailed guidelines for implementing physical security controls, including access restrictions, surveillance systems, perimeter security and vitality of biometric authentication, security badges, and restricted entry points, to prevent those attacks.

Conclusion

In an increasingly digital world where data is often considered the new currency, data centers serve as the fortresses that safeguard the invaluable assets of organizations. While we often associate data security with firewalls, encryption, and cyber threats, it’s imperative not to overlook the significance of physical security within these data fortresses. 

By assessing risks associated with physical security, environmental factors, and access controls, data center operators can take proactive measures to mitigate said risks. These measures greatly aid data centers in preventing unauthorized access, which can lead to data theft, service disruptions, and financial losses. Additionally, failing to meet compliance regulations can result in severe legal consequences and damage to an organization’s reputation.

In a perfect world, simply implementing iron-clad physical barriers and adhering to compliance regulations would completely eliminate the risk of data breaches. Unfortunately, that’s simply not the case. Both data center security and compliance encompass not only both cybersecurity and physical security, but secure data sanitization and destruction as well. The best way to achieve that level of security is with an in-house destruction plan. 

In-house data decommissioning allows organizations to implement and enforce customized security measures that align with their individual security policies and industry regulations. When data decommissioning is outsourced, there’s a risk that the third-party vendor may not handle the data with the same level of care and diligence as in-house teams would.

Throughout this blog, we’ve briefly mentioned that data centers should implement a chain of custody, especially during decommissioning. In-house data decommissioning and implementing a data chain of custody provide data centers the highest levels of control, customization, and security, making it the preferred choice for organizations that prioritize data protection, compliance, and risk mitigation. By keeping data decommissioning within their own control, organizations can ensure that their sensitive information is handled with the utmost care and security throughout its lifecycle.

At SEM, we have a wide range of data center solutions designed for you to securely destroy any and all sensitive information your data center is storing, including the SEM iWitness Media Tracking System and the Model DC-S1-3. 

The iWitness is a tool used in end-of-life data destruction to document the data’s chain of custody and a slew of crucial details during the decommissioning process. The hand-held device reports the drive’s serial number, model and manufacturer, the method of destruction and tool used, the name of the operator, date of destruction, and more, all easily exported into one CSV file. 

The DC-S1-3 is specifically designed for data centers to destroy enterprise rotational/magnetic drives and solid state drives. This state-of-the-art solution uses specially designed saw tooth hook cutters to shred those end-of-life rotational hard drives to a consistent 1.5″ particle size. This solution is available in three configurations: HDD, SSD, and a HDD/SSD Combo. The DC-S1-3 series is ideal for the shredding of HDDs, SSDs, data tapes, cell phones, smartphones, optical media, PCBs, and other related electronic storage media. 

The consequences of improper data destruction are endless, and statute of limitations don’t apply to data breaches. No matter what the industry, purchasing in-house, end-of-life data destruction equipment is well worth the investment. This can in turn potentially save your data center more time and money in the long run by preventing breaches early on.

Data Centers and NIST Compliance: Why 800-53 is Just the Start

August 22, 2023 at 4:42 pm by Amanda Canale

The world of data storage has been exponentially growing for the past several years and shows no signs of slowing down. From paper to floppy disks, HDDs to SSDs, and large servers to cloud-based infrastructures, the way we store data has become increasingly intricate using the latest and greatest major technological advancements. 

As the way we store our data continues to evolve, it’s becoming increasingly vital for data centers, federal agencies, and organizations alike to implement proper and secure data cybersecurity and information security practices, and appropriate procedures for secure data sanitization and destruction. Data center compliance is essential for various reasons, primarily centered around ensuring the security, integrity, and reliability of their data and systems. By complying with industry standards and regulations, data centers can safeguard sensitive data and ensure that proper security measures are in place to prevent unauthorized access, data breaches, and cyberattacks – both while data storage devices are in use and when they reach end-of-life. 

In summary, data center compliance falls under both cybersecurity and physical security best practices, and secure data sanitization and destruction. For a data center to operate at optimal performance and security, one cannot be without the other.

When discussing data center compliance, it’s important to not leave out an important player: the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). NIST is one of the most widely recognized and adopted cybersecurity frameworks, is the industry’s most comprehensive and in-depth set of framework controls, and is a non-regulatory federal agency. NIST’s mission is to educate citizens on information system security for all applications outside of national security, including industry, government, academia, and healthcare on both a national and global scale. 

Their strict and robust standards and guidelines are widely recognized and adopted by both data centers and government entities alike seeking to improve their processes, quality, and security. 

In today’s blog, I want to dive into the two most important NIST publications data centers should consistently reference and implement into their security practices: NIST 800-88 and NIST 800-53. Both standardizations help create consistency across the industry, allowing data centers to communicate and collaborate with, and more effectively protect partners, clients, and regulatory bodies. Again: cybersecurity and destruction best practices go hand-in-hand, and should be implemented as a pair in order for a data center to operate compliantly. 

Step 1: Data Center Security and Privacy Framework

NIST 800-53

NIST 800-53 provides guidelines and recommendations for selecting and specifying security and privacy controls for federal information systems and organizations. While NIST 800-53 is primarily utilized by federal agencies, its principles and controls are widely recognized and adopted as a critical resource for information security and privacy management, not only by federal agencies but also by private sector organizations, international entities, and more importantly, data centers. 

NIST 800-53 serves as a comprehensive catalog of security and privacy controls that data centers can use to design, implement, and assess the security posture of their IT systems and infrastructure, all of which are crucial in sustaining a data center. The controls are related to data protection, encryption, data retention, and data disposal, and serve as a valuable resource for data centers looking to establish intricate and well-rounded cybersecurity and information security programs. 

NIST 800-53 addresses various aspects of information security, such as access control, incident response, system and communications protection, security assessment, and more. Each control is paired with specific guidelines and implementation details. These security controls, of which there are over a thousand, are further categorized into twenty “control families” based on their common objectives. (For example, access control controls are grouped together, as are incident response controls, and so forth.) These control families cover various aspects of security, including access control, network security, system monitoring, incident response, and more, offering data centers much higher rates of uptime and ability to minimize downtime.

Since data centers often handle sensitive and valuable information, they require robust physical security measures to prevent breaches and unauthorized access. NIST 800-53 addresses physical security controls, including access controls, video surveillance, intrusion detection systems, and environmental monitoring, which are vital in protecting the data center’s infrastructure.

It’s important to mention that while NIST 800-53 provides an increasingly valuable foundation for securing data center operations, organizations may need to tailor the controls to their specific environments, risk profiles, and compliance requirements. NIST 800-53 offers a flexible framework that allows for customization to suit the unique needs of different data center operators, making it a vital and critical resource.

Step 2: Data Destruction Compliance 

NIST 800-88

First published in 2006, NIST 800-88 and its Guidelines for Media Sanitization provides guidance and regulations on how citizens can conduct the secure and proper sanitization and/or destruction of media containing sensitive, classified, and top secret information. NIST 800-88 covers various types of media, including hard drives (HDDs), solid-state drives (SSDs), magnetic tapes, optical media, and other media storage devices. NIST 800-88 has quickly become the utmost standard for the U.S. Government and has been continuously referenced in federal data privacy laws. More so, NIST 800-88 regulations have been increasingly adopted by private companies and organizations, especially data centers. The main objective is to help data centers and organizations establish proper procedures for sanitizing media before its disposal at end-of-life.

When a data center facility or section is being decommissioned, equipment such as servers, storage devices, and networking gear must be properly sanitized and disposed of. NIST 800-88’s guidelines help data center operators develop procedures to securely handle the removal and disposal of equipment without risking future data breaches 

When it comes to sanitizing media, NIST 800-88 offers three key methods:

  1. Clearing: The act of overwriting media with non-sensitive data to prevent data recovery.
  2. Purging: A more thorough and comprehensive method that will render the stored data unrecoverable using advanced technology, such as cryptographic erasure and block erasing.
  3. Destruction: The physical destruction of a storage device either by way of shredding, crushing, disintegrating, or incineration. This often includes electromagnetic degaussing, a method that produces a buildup of electrical energy to create a magnetic field that scrambles and breaks the drive’s binary code, rendering it completely inoperable. The strength of the degausser is critical when eliminating sensitive information from magnetic media. Typically, degaussers evaluated and listed by the National Security Agency (NSA) are considered the golden standard. 

However, even these methods can come with their own drawbacks. For instance: 

  1. Clearing: For sensitive, classified, or top secret information, clearing or overwriting should never serve as the sole destruction method. Overwriting is only applicable to HDDs, not SSDs or Flash, and does not fully remove the information from the drive. 
  2. Purging: Unfortunately, purging methods are highly prone to human error and are a very time-consuming process.
  3. Destruction: Once the drive has been destroyed, it cannot be reused or repurposed. However, this method provides the assurance and security that the data is fully unrecoverable, the process can take mere seconds, and there is no room for human error.

The chosen destruction and/or sanitization method depends on the sensitivity of the information on the media and the level of protection required, so it is crucial that data centers and organizations take into account the classification of information and media type, as well as the risk to confidentiality. NIST 800-88 provides valuable guidance on media sanitization practices, which are crucial for data centers to ensure the secure disposal of data-filled devices while minimizing the risk of data breaches. Proper implementation of NIST guidelines allows data center officials to protect sensitive information and maintain data security throughout the lifecycle of data center equipment.

The Importance of Verification 

NIST guidelines, specifically NIST 800-88, have become the industry standard when it comes to secure data sanitization; however, they are not as definitive as other regulatory compliances. With NIST, the responsibility of data sanitization falls onto data centers’ or an agency’s chief information officers, system security managers, and other related staff.

As discussed above, the destruction and/or sanitization method depends on the sensitivity of the information on the media and the level of protection required, so it is critical to the security of the end-of-life data that organizations discuss the matters of security categorization, media chain of custody including internal and external considerations, and the risk to confidentiality.

Regardless of the method chosen, verification is the next critical step in the destruction and sanitization process. NIST verification typically refers to the process of validating or verifying compliance with standards, guidelines, or protocols established by the data center and/or organization. By NIST 800-88 standards, verification is the process of testing the end-of-life media to see if the stored information is accessible. 

For sanitization equipment to be verified, it must be subjected to testing and certification, such as the NSA evaluation and listing, and must abide by a strict maintenance schedule. For proper sanitization, the device must be verified through a third party testing should the media be reused. However, when media is destroyed, no such verification is necessary, as the pulverized material itself is verification enough. 

Since third party testing can be impractical, time consuming, and a gateway to data breaches, we at SEM always push for the in-house sanitization and destruction of media as the only choice to ensure full sanitization of data and the only way to mitigate future risks. When destroying data in-house, companies can be positive that the data is successfully destroyed. 

Conclusion

When it comes to data center compliance and security, there is no one-stop-shop. Adhering to both NIST 800-88 and 800-53 guidelines enhances the reputation of data centers by demonstrating a commitment to data security and privacy. This can help build trust with clients, customers, and stakeholders, leading to stronger business relationships. More importantly, these guidelines are necessary when collecting, storing, using, or destroying certain data. NIST provides educational resources, training materials, and documentation that help data center staff understand security concepts and best practices, empowering data center personnel to implement effective security measures.

At SEM, we have a wide range of NSA listed and noted solutions and CUI/NIST 800-88 compliant devices designed for you to securely destroy sensitive information. After all, the consequences of improper data destruction are endless and there is no statute of limitations on data breaches. No matter what the industry, purchasing in-house, end-of-life data destruction equipment is well worth the investment. Need us to craft a custom solution for your data center? You can find out more here. 

Uptime Institute’s Tier Classification: Everything You Need to Know

July 25, 2023 at 7:01 pm by Amanda Canale

Just as Security Engineered Machinery has been the global standard when it comes to high security data destruction solutions, the Uptime Institute’s Tier Classification has served as the international standard for data center performances. The classification evaluates data centers’ server hosting availability and reliability, and for the past 25 years, the Uptime Institute has had over 2,800 certifications in over 114 countries across the globe.

With the Uptime Institute’s Tier Classification, comes four tiers that are centered on data center infrastructure and define the criteria needed for maintenance, power, cooling, and fault capabilities: Tiers I, II, III, and IV.

Before we dive into the Uptime Institute’s Tier Classification, I want to run through some data center vocabulary:

Uptime

Uptime is the annual amount of time that a data center is guaranteed to be available and running. This time increases in degrees of “nines,” or a 99% availability guarantee. A data center with 99.671% uptime offers far less availability and reliability than one that has 99.982% uptime. 

Essentially, a data center wants to achieve as many “nines” as possible. A 99.9% availability (or “three nines”) will still allow for approximately eight hours of downtime per year. If a data center has 99.999% (“five nines”) then they have less than six minutes of downtime per year, or approximately twenty-six seconds per month.

Downtime

Downtime is the annual amount of time that a data center and its availability will be interrupted. Downtime can occur for a number of reasons: routine maintenance, hardware failures, natural disasters, cyberattacks, and the most common, human error. 

Whenever a data center experiences downtime, there’s a cost: according to the ITIC’s 11th Annual Hourly Cost of Downtime Survey, an hour of downtime can cost some firms and corporations anywhere from $1 to $5 million, not including any potential legal fees, fines, and penalties. The more downtime a data center has, the higher the risk they run of data breaches due to the lack of or little protection and security monitoring they have during this time. It’s also important to mention that downtime not only affects the data center employees: downtime prevents outside customers and clients form accessing services and information, too. So even if a data center experiences downtime that does not result in a data breach, it can have very real monetary and reputational consequences.

Redundancy

Redundancy is a data center component designed to duplicate primary resources and power in the case of failure. These fail-safe systems can be in the form of backup generators, uninterruptible power systems (UPS), and cooling systems, to ensure that data centers can continue to run if another component fails.

Now, let’s dive into each tier!

Tier I

Tier I is a data center at its most basic level of availability. This first tier offers no guarantee of redundancy and at a minimum, offers data centers an UPS for power spikes, lags, and outages. Most small businesses and warehouses that lack around-the-clock operations with minimal power operate at a Tier I level. Tier I facilities operate on a single distribution path for power and cooling, which can easily be overloaded or fall susceptible to planned and unplanned disruptions. In return, Tier I offers 99.671% redundancy, meaning that there is a maximum of 28.8 hours of downtime per year, allowing a lot of vulnerable room for any kind of disruption and subsequent breach. 

Tier II

Tier II facilities offer a bit more uptime, with a 99.741% rating, equaling no more than 22 hours of downtime per year. Like Tier I facilities, Tier II’s operate on a single distribution path for power and cooling but offer other options for maintenance and disruption mitigation. Some of these features include engine generators, cooling units, pumps, and heat rejection equipment. While not by much, this little bump in availability can guarantee data center’s reliability, but it still does not fully protect them from unexpected shutdowns.

Tier III

Unlike Tier I and II facilities, Tier III’s are generally utilized by larger businesses and offer more than one redundant distribution path, meaning that the infrastructure has the capacity and availability to fully support the IT load and offer backup to ensure performance and reliability. This spike in reliability allows for 99.982% of uptime, resulting in less than or equal to 1.6 hours of downtime per year.

While this tier is significantly more reliable, it is not completely fault tolerant. Tier III allows for routine maintenance without impacting service, but are still vulnerable to outages, spikes, and power lags. 

Tier IV

Tier IV is the most sophisticated tier and is typically used by enterprise corporations. This tier offers twice the operational capacity (or 2N) as well as additional backup components (or +1), for ultimate reliability. In this tier, every critical component of the data center’s primary infrastructure is duplicated and fired at max capacity, meaning that even in a disruption, operations are able to continue. 

Tier IV facilities offer a 99.995% uptime per year, or less than or equal to 26.3 minutes of downtime. While this level of classification can be the most expensive to implement, it is the one generally populated by government organizations and larger enterprise corporations.

data-protection-officer

Conclusion

The Uptime Institute’s Tier Classification demonstrates that in any data center setting and scale, it is absolutely vital to have redundancies in place in order to have the lowest amount of down time possible. Data centers should strive to reach the highest tier in order to maintain their high levels of performance, availability, and reliability.

In equal vitality, ultimate data center security also requires a detailed and clear data decommissioning program as part of their operations plan to ensure other safety, security, and operational safeguards are in place. The best way to achieve that level of security is with an in-house destruction plan for HDDs, SSDs, and other data center media types. When implemented improperly, data centers can fall subject to breaches and experience extreme financial loss and irredeemable public trust. At SEM, we offer NIST 800-88 compliant degaussers, crushers, and shredders that are versatile enough to fit in any environment and scale along with auditing and documentation systems. 

Since our inception in 1967, SEM has served as the industry leader in high security, comprehensive end-of-life data destruction solutions that ensure the protection of sensitive, classified, and top secret information within the government, intelligence community, and commercial markets. Our solutions are specifically designed and manufactured to comply with the most frequently cited and stringent of regulatory requirements and compliance mandates, including the National Security Agency’s (NSA) Evaluated Product List (EPL) — which is used to determine if a data destruction device is approved to destroy the US Government’s top secret and classified materials. 

Over the years, many data centers have pivoted to having the most secure data-decommissioning policy, in-house destruction. By using devices like the SEM 0300 shredder line, EMP1000-HS degausser, 2SSD, and iWitness documentation tool – data centers data is more secure than ever when the drives reach end of life.  

The fact of the matter is: the further we get into the Digital Age, the more criticality there is in protecting our most sensitive of data. Corporations, businesses, and enterprises all require a data center that can deliver reliability comparable to their uptime requirements and an in-house data destruction plan.

The Move to 5G and Increased Data Size will Introduce Both New and Familiar Security Risks

October 31, 2019 at 12:25 pm by Paul Falcone

Destroying storage devices at end-of-life will be critical as data centers utilize new tech.WESTBOROUGH, MA, October 29, 2019 —Security Engineered Machinery Co., Inc. (SEM), global leader in high security information end-of-life solutions, published a whitepaper warning of the security risks that will be introduced as the transition from 4G to 5G rolls out over the next few years. The paper, written by SEM President Andrew Kelleher, stresses the criticality of having proper data decommissioning policies and equipment to securely destroy physical media that holds sensitive information in data centers around the world.

“We have seen the world’s information all move towards the digital format over the last decade with our communication, the internet, and streaming entertainment,” commented Kelleher. “Now, the upcoming transition to the 5G network will allow larger, more dense data to move at faster speeds to more people than ever before. Data centers will have to scale their technology in-house to meet these latest technological advancements and it is imperative that obsolete drives are disposed of properly.”

For consumers of digital media and content creators, this 5G rollout is exciting news. For businesses that store and handle data, however, this transition will present some costly, high security risk challenges. One often overlooked risk in the digital age comes in the form of data disposal and destruction. With the growing threat to cybersecurity, where an attempted attack happens every 39 seconds, physical end-of-life destruction is often treated as a less immediate concern. The fact is that the improper disposal of physical media can lead to devastating effects to government entities, individual companies, organizations, and consumers.

“It is critical for companies to acknowledge and address the security challenges that these changes will present as old media is replaced, and having a proper plan and policy will be crucial to a secure transition,” Kelleher continued. “Planning now can protect the future of consumers, data centers, and individual companies that host their data in data centers as the transition to the future begins.”

To read the whitepaper, click here.